Two Reminders From Antonin Scalia

Antonin_Scalia_2010Antonin Scalia’s recent demise has everyone thinking; mostly it seems about the divided nature of our country and President Obama’s choice to fill the Supreme Court vacancy. But it’s got me thinking about two different matters. The first is reasoning and decision-making. Justice Scalia was known for sound reasoning proceeding from firm legal principles resting on a view of the Constitution as having a single and unchanging meaning. Many disagree with his views on that last part, but his method and legal record should remind us that our principles must rest on something. We can’t draw our principles from nothing.

Reasoning is important to us as we make decisions and take actions to improve our health and wellbeing. What is the best way to live? How should we decide? What is our model? What principles have we found to guide us in decision-making, and on what foundation do they rest? Here’s a diagram of how I’m viewing the best case for us as we proceed.

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We should be making our choices after reasoning through the facts of our personal situations using the principles that apply, and those principles should be based firmly on reality as we understand it. In short, reality matters. Are body and mind separate “parts” of people? Do humans have souls and an eternal existence? Is there an unseen spiritual reality underlying and supporting our perceived material reality? If so, how does that work?

Just as the Supreme Court Justices have different views the nature and meaning of the Constitution, as individual people, we may have differing understandings of reality. Their disagreements, based on variation in views of the Constitution, illustrate for us how our views on reality matter in our personal choices. The President and the Senate together will select the next Justice, based in part on his or her view of the Constitution, and we have little control over that. However, we each have complete control over how we understand reality, and there is nothing more important.

Yet how much time does the average person devote to thinking about the big picture, to investigating the big topics? How much time have you spent investigating and settling upon a personal worldview, one supported by evidence? Many people choose to “go with the flow” and accept the prevailing cultural norms. That’s what I did for a long time, until a more careful inquiry caused me to rethink it and draw new conclusions; conclusions that have changed my principles, choices, actions and results – for the better!

I encourage you to thoroughly investigate reality for yourself. Ask the hard questions, spend the time to search the evidence and draw firm conclusions before more of your life passes behind you. Which brings up the second Scalia reminder. His death reminds me that I am going to die. So are you, and no one knows when for either of us. The second matter makes the first all the more important.