The One Human Right

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.
– Declaration of Independence 7/4/1776

People have rights! Especially Americans. Our founders got us started with the three mentioned above. Apparently they felt these were universal “human rights” given to us directly from God. Shortly after that sentence, they add in the right to change the government. In subsequent documents and decisions Americans collectively have added many more “civil rights,” that is rights granted by our government and codified in laws and regulations. Unfortunately, and as everyone in America has figured out lately, one man’s civil rights are another man’s civil obligations. Enforcing our ever-increasing canon of civil rights has required a corresponding increase in government scrutiny of and coercive power over our lives as individuals.

It’s pretty obvious that all countries don’t have the same civil rights. In a sense civil rights are elective – we choose them, or not. Not every society chooses the similarly. Crossing a border changes your “rights” as an individual. One doesn’t have the same rights in North Korea as one has in the United States, as too many unfortunate and naive travelers have discovered.

Also “right” seems to be a much over-used word these days. We often use it in casual conversation to justify self-centeredness or a sense of entitlement. Think, “I’ve got a right to ______.” (be angry, treat myself, spend my money on _____ )

It’s got me wondering, perhaps like you, what are our basic, bottom-line rights? Where do we draw the line? What’s our minimum? Do we really need or want all of these civil rights? Are our civil rights also human rights?   Really? Which rights truly come from our Creator and which have we just made up as we go along? Naturally as a follower of Jesus, I’ve searched the Bible and pondered these questions from a Christian perspective.

Honestly I can’t find too much on this. No disrespect intended to our founding fathers, but nowhere in the Bible do I read of God giving human beings the right to life, liberty or the pursuit of happiness. Nor do I see the right to be married, the right to a job, the right to healthcare, the right to privacy, or the right not to be discriminated against. There’s hardly anything on God granting us rights.

On the other hand I do see a great deal of obligation. God is pretty clear on how we should treat him, ourselves, and one another. For example, people shouldn’t steal from or murder others. Those are “human obligations,” but obligations do not create a reciprocal rights. We all have a God-given obligation not to steal, not a God-given right never to experience theft. Beyond the traditional moral code, it’s also very clear that we are to love God, love one another, and even to love our neighbors as ourselves – a tall order indeed.

That’s kind of bad news – not much in the way of rights from God, and lots of obligations that no one keeps, not even us followers of Jesus. We had better get used to tough breaks, oppression, and harm. Be it the United States, North Korea, or somewhere in between, governments are going to do what they do. People will hurt us. Bad things, even evil things, will happen to us. It’s nice if they don’t, but we’ve no right to anything else in this life.

The good news is that I did find one human right, “the right to become children of God” (John 1:12) through the work of Jesus. On the surface, it would seem more a privilege rather than a right, but God doesn’t change his mind or go back on his word. Once you belong to Jesus, there is no condemnation, no rejection, and an acceptance that cannot be lost – period. God himself grants you a life, a freedom and a joy that cannot be taken away by any government or any man.

The only human right you have is the only one you need.

Exercise your right today.

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He came into the very world he created, but the world didn’t recognize him. He came to his own people, and even they rejected him. But to all who believed him and accepted him, he gave the right to become children of God. They are reborn—not with a physical birth resulting from human passion or plan, but a birth that comes from God.
John 1:10-13 NLT