Fat – The Enemy Within

Well the new consulting career is officially begun!  I’ve just returned from a two-day engagement as a member of an advisory panel for a pharmaceutical manufacturer seeking input on the future of medical treatment for obesity and its complications. It was an interesting and enjoyable event. Most of what we talked about is confidential of course, but our more general discussions covered much of what is commonly known about the conditions of obesity and overweight. Common or not, two things struck me as worth writing about to an audience interested in health and wellness.

First, if you’re significantly overweight, your fat cells are working against you.  It’s easy to regard fat as just so much excess baggage, perhaps causing some bodily wear and tear, but otherwise inert.  It’s really a much more serious situation.  Fat cells are anything but inert.  They’re highly active metabolically, releasing and causing to be released chemical factors that adversely impact your internal physiology in multiple ways. I’m not going to go into the details, take my word for it, these guys are bad actors. To use an analogy from the headlines, think of your excess fat as tiny cellular Russians working to disrupt your body’s politics. You don’t want Putin hijacking your physiology’s executive branch.

Second, most obese and significantly overweight people suffering from diabetes or other physiologic disruptions never get much better.  Why not?  Well, that was an interesting discussion!  We all have our thoughts.  You’ve heard most of mine before, but here they are again:  People are weak, temptations are hard to resist. Life is hard, people are stressed out, and food is emotionally comforting; often the more comforting, the more unhealthy. Losing weight is hard work, and mostly we don’t like hard work.  Like water, we tend to take the path of least resistance, and the wide river of American popular culture empties its contents into the lake of obesity.  (And there are also some more “hard-wired” biological reasons that it’s very difficult to lose weight – hence the interest of pharmaceutical manufacturers)

But, as we also all know, some people get remarkably better.  We all know a few. How did they succeed where others try and fail or fail to try?  Once again, an interesting topic with no exact answers.  Here are my observations:  Some people simply “wake up” or “snap out of it” – having a sudden recognition and acceptance of their issue along with a willingness to do whatever it takes to get better.  (Maybe caused by a medical event or health crisis – e.g. a heart attack or needing to start insulin.) Some have a more gradual building of their awareness and resolve to levels sufficient to enable positive action. Many appear to need to hit an emotional and/or spiritual “bottom,” admitting their defeat and enlisting the help of God and others. The common theme is that some sort of internal shift occurs and then it’s a whole new ballgame.

If you’re struggling with your weight, or if you’ve even given up the struggle, have hope, because some people get remarkably better.  It can be done.  You too can do it, but first you need to have that mysterious “internal shift” and I can’t give that to you.  However I can invite you to shift, perhaps you’re almost there already and just need a nudge over the line.  Consider yourself invited – snap out of it and get going!

Most importantly, know that God can change you.  God wants to change you, and he has all power.  He never fails.  Turn to him to become the person you can’t be on your own.  And, as always, let me know if I can help.

Grace and peace,

Pete

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PS – for you movie fans – snap out of it!

Comments

  1. Gene Truchelut says:

    Congratulations on the new consulting career, Pete!