A Vacation Reset

Sharon, the kids (adult kids) and I just returned from a weeklong vacation in northern California, Santa Rosa and San Francisco to be specific. We spent time connecting and reconnecting with various branches of our extended family and seeing the sights. It was a relaxing and restful time. Now that we’re home, I’m reflecting on my experience, and here are some of my takeaways.

I worry too much. The trip took my attention away from all of my usual responsibilities. No thinking about home or work issues, just staying “in the now” as they say. I enjoyed visiting people and places, and he most critical daily issue usually was “what are we doing for lunch?” Life got simple and immediate. It was nice. How can I bring this simplicity and immediacy back home with me? I’m resolving to be more attuned to the present and spend less mental energy on the future.

My family is worth my time. Not just my immediate family but also the extended family. People are relational creatures,designed to be in community with one another, and that starts with our families. If all we do is “see the family” that alone is worth the trip. Seeing the sights is not as important as seeing the people. I’ve got to remember that.

Disconnecting from the media is a good idea. While gone, I didn’t read the morning newspapers and didn’t miss them. I didn’t watch the news, and I didn’t engage in much social media. Although, we remained aware of breaking news and current events through the internet, we didn’t put much energy into analysis or discussion of the latest “crisis.” That was refreshing.

I was still thinking about our media-driven, feverish culture on the way home. During a three-hour layover in DFW, watching many hundreds of people (of all shapes, sizes and colors) go by, I got to thinking about them. About how each one of them, like me, had a life to live, and perhaps a family to care for. And about how each of them needed to think about getting home, eating lunch, and also the larger issues in their lives. And finally, about how little that most of the “crisis news” has to do with that.

The well-lived life is mostly an internal affair. I need to keep working on myself. And, with God’s help, I shall.

Pete